Financial Freedom

When Is It Time to Cut Your Kids Off From Your Finances?

Deciding when to let your children stand on their own can be tough, especially when they’re contending with student loans, underpaying jobs, or sky-high rents. But easing your kid’s entry into adulthood could be undermining your own financial security.

According to a December survey from CreditCards.com, three-quarters of parents are providing financial support for their adult kids.

But at a time when the majority of Americans haven’t socked away nearly enough for retirement—the median retirement savings for all working families in the US is just $5,000, according to the Economic Policy Institute—it makes sense to do a little less for our offspring, so we can think a little more about ourselves.

So, how do you figure out when and how to cut your kids off financially?  Learn more below. 

Don't bother wondering why your friends seem to have nicer homes, cars, and vacations — there's only one measurement that matters

Basing your spending off how your friends spend their money is a huge mistake to make.  Large spenders may also be building crippling debt.  

You won't find a real answer to how you're doing in a Federal Reserve survey or a social media feed.  You will find it by measuring yourself against rules of thumb, refined over decades and endorsed by financial pros  that point the way toward true financial health. 

Start with these:

9 Ways to Build Wealth in Your 50s

Midlife is filled with challenges and opportunities. Yes, you might be in the thick of paying for college, but soon all those other costs that come with kids should be behind you—or so you hope. You're also likely in your peak earning years and when you're making the most is also when you should squirrel away the most.

Some 40% of successful savers—those who built nest eggs equivalent to 10 times pay—did so by saving 15% or more of their incomes for at least 10 years.  Here's how...

Test Your Retirement IQ

What's the biggest threat to a comfortable retirement? Ignorance. The decisions you make leading up to retirement, including how much to save, how to allocate your investments, when to take Social Security and how to anticipate your retirement expenses can make a big difference in your old age. 

And the decisions don't stop on Day One of your post-career life. Once you're in retirement, you'll need smart strategies for taking withdrawals and investing your resources so they last as long as you do.

o how well-versed are you on this critical subject? Take this quiz to find out.  Click link below. 

The Big Lesson From 2016 for Your Retirement Planning

Here's what you should take away from the year that included Brexit and Trump's election.

When it comes to takeaways that can improve your retirement planning and investing, I think there’s one big lesson we should all draw from 2016.

Tony Robbins’ 10 Tips for Living Rich

If you want to be happy, but you’re having a tough time in life due to personal or financial issues, it’s important to take whatever steps possible — even small ones — to progress and grow.

This best-selling author’s advice has been featured prominently in magazines, digital media and in national televised media. He travels all over the country every month for events to inspire people in their lives and in business. 

Click the link below for some of Tony's top pieces of advice on how to change your mindset in ways that can have a positive impact on your life and your finances.

6 Surprising Money Habits of Millionaires

Most millionaires aren’t driving Lamborghinis and eating caviar. They’re driving reliable used cars and eating mashed potatoes and meatloaf. Millionaires aren’t wealthy because they’re lucky. They’re wealthy because they follow simple money habits year after year. Click below to learn more about Dave Ramsey's 6 Surprising Habits of Millionaires.  

When Will I Be Retirement Ready?

How do we know when we have enough for retirement?  Given it’s National Save for Retirement Week, there’s no better time than now to take the mystery out of saving for retirement.    

The objective is that when you arrive at the golden years and find that they are truly golden-  It's called FINANCIAL FREEDOM.                                                                              

And it's easier to get there with a little planning-  even in your 20s- Because it's closer than you think!


Click the link below to learn when you will be "Retirement Ready."

How Cars Affect Your Financial Freedom

It’s not that I don’t want a really fancy car, it is just that there is something I want a bit more: financial freedom.  Car payments are many times the #1 obstacle that causes the average family not to achieve financial stability. Spend some time thinking about your current car situation.  Are your car purchases making your bank richer or you? 

Below is a great read about "How Your Car Affects Your Financial Freedom."